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(Source: vintibranson, via crgasmic)

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zukozukozukozukozuko:

my favorite thing in stories is when the antagonist doesn’t die, but instead they realize they were being kind of a stupid dick (maybe because the protagonist saved them or something) and then they have to kind of awkwardly tag along with the heroes in order to make up for their mistakes and gradually become slightly less evil

(via idiotbrunette)

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did-you-kno:

In 1957, BBC’s Panorama produced a fake report of a family in Switzerland harvesting spaghetti from trees as an April Fool’s joke. As a result, hundreds of people called the station to ask how they could grow their own spaghetti trees. Source

did-you-kno:

In 1957, BBC’s Panorama produced a fake report of a family in Switzerland harvesting spaghetti from trees as an April Fool’s joke. As a result, hundreds of people called the station to ask how they could grow their own spaghetti trees. Source

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breakfastburritoe:

in first grade we had to write down our favorite ice cream flavor and the whole class put cookie dough so i put cookie dough bc peer pressure and then we were asked to color in an ice cream scoop with our favorite flavor and i had no clue what cookie dough was so i colored it blue and the class made fun of me and then some kid ate a napkin

(via dutchster)

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lolshtus:

You’re A Hazard, Harry

lolshtus:

You’re A Hazard, Harry

(via waitingforthesong)

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did-you-kno:

These photographs of the Orion Nebula look pretty similar, even though one is a 50 minute exposure from 1880, and the other is a 1 second iPhone shot from 2013.  Source

did-you-kno:

These photographs of the Orion Nebula look pretty similar, even though one is a 50 minute exposure from 1880, and the other is a 1 second iPhone shot from 2013. Source

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(Source: imsirius, via himymthebest)

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smartgirlsattheparty:

bobbycaputo:

Here’s Why We Need to Protect Public Libraries

We live in a “diverse and often fractious country,” writes Robert Dawson, but there are some things that unite us—among them, our love of libraries. “A locally governed and tax-supported system that dispenses knowledge and information for everyone throughout the country at no cost to its patrons is an astonishing thing,” the photographer writes in the introduction to his book, The Public Library: A Photographic Essay. “It is a shared commons of our ambitions, our dreams, our memories, our culture, and ourselves.”

But what do these places look like? Over the course of 18 years, Dawson found out. Inspired by “the long history of photographic survey projects,” he traveled thousands of miles and photographed hundreds of public libraries in nearly all 50 states. Looking at the photos, the conclusion is unavoidable: American libraries are as diverse as Americans. They’re large and small, old and new, urban and rural, and in poor and wealthy communities. Architecturally, they represent a range of styles, from the grand main branch of the New York Public Library to the humble trailer that serves as a library in Death Valley National Park, the hottest place on Earth. “Because they’re all locally funded, libraries reflect the communities they’re in,” Dawson said in an interview. “The diversity reflects who we are as a people.”

(Continue Reading)

We love libraries!! 

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(Source: sembarreira, via un-control)

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tastefullyoffensive:

Crazy Ideas That Just Need to Happen Already [via]

Previously: Mind-Boggling Shower Thoughts